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kasparovfan 35 ( +1 | -1 )
Keres attack It is often said that Kasparov employs the Najdorf move order to arrive at the Scheveningen variation, thus avoiding the Keres Attack. But what exactly is it about the Najdorf move order that makes the Keres attack unplayable. Or, in other words, which Najdorf movemakes which Keres move unplayable?
mattafort 63 ( +1 | -1 )
paste this link in your Browser it is the search result of searchline
Najdorf Sicilian "Keres attack"
in Google Group chess.analyse
- 47 hits

groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=ISO-8859-1&safe=off&q=Najdorf+Sicilian+%27%22Keres+attack%22+group%3Arec.games.chess.analysis&btnG=Google+Search&meta=group%3Drec.games.chess.analysis

mattafort
213.100.118.115:7000/mattachess
213.100.118.115:7000/mattafort
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mattafort 69 ( +1 | -1 )
this one is good This thread deals with EXACTLY your subject!

groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&safe=off&th=a5790a75b80b2f55&rnum=16

Quote:
"Unfortunately, my opponents are not willing to let me win
quietly, and I am often faced with choosing between death by the Keres
Attack, or death by the Richter-Rauzer.

I had read that Kasparov doesn't particularly like facing the Keres so that
he employs the Najdorf move order until White commits to a development
scheme."

We can find anything about chess on the web,
and "chess.analysis" Google Group is a GOOD ONE!

/matta
dorisia 91 ( +1 | -1 )
Keres Attack After 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cd 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6, the move 6.g4 is of course impossible since it looses a Pawn.

If White plays a "waiting" move such as 6.a4 then after 6... e6 the move 7.g4 doesn't look particularly good, since a4 is slightly out of place in a Kingside pawn storm; instead White should develop according to the Scheveningen schemes.

Also 6.h3 followed by g4 is a loss of time.

After 6.Be2 e6, it's a standard Scheveningen.

If White wants to play g4, the best bet is to play 6.Be3; after the "Scheveningen" 6... e6 (instead of the "Najdorf" 6... e5) White can certainly continue with 7.g4! as has been played many times; see for instance the game Topalov-Kasparov, Moscow Olympiad 1994, won by White in 28 moves.

In all Najdorf lines, if Black plays ... e5, White cannot play g4 without preparation, and it would therefore involve some loss of time; again the move 6.Be3 is a good bet to plan Kingside operations with the move g4, for instance 6.Be3 e5 7.Nb3 Be6 8.Qd2 Nbd7 9.f3 Be7 (9... b5 10.g4!?) 10.g4.
loreta 3 ( +1 | -1 )
Dorisia You're too strong in your knowledge :-)